Memory

Regardless of preferences on genre and style, music is something that all people can appreciate, no matter their age.

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Music therapy can help seniors at risk for dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

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A study published in the journal Nature Neuroscience found that caffeine can improve focus and attention as well as short-term memory.

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A four-month study found that individuals with Alzheimer's disease can increase brain function by singing songs from hit musicals, The Guardian reported.

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According to researchers at Cork University in Ireland, blood pressure drugs may be able to slow the progression of Alzheimer's and even boost cognitive abilities

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As your or a loved one age, it can be hard to take care of things as well as you did in the past. It can be hard to tell when it's time to ask for help or start looking into in home care agencies, but if you are aware of the warning signs, you can be proactive in talking to your family about your concerns for yourself or a loved one.

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Incorporating music as a part of Alzheimer's care services can help ease the challenges that accompany the disease. Music can be used to effectively alter your client's mood, manage agitation caused by stress and activate the brain's cognitive abilities. It can also help with motor skills because the rhythmic patterns can evoke subconscious memories. Music isn't only soothing for the person with Alzheimer's disease either. Caregivers and family members can also benefit from the stress-relieving properties of music therapy.

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Last month Debbie, a family caregiver and mother of three in Wisconsin went to check on her elderly father, John. Debbie was concerned when there was no response at the front door and used her spare key to enter John’s home. She found him lying on the kitchen floor, unable to get up after falling. Luckily, Debbie found him a short time after his fall, and a trip to the hospital showed no broken bones. However, John’s right arm and leg were hurt, and we would need to stay in a wheelchair and wear a sling for a few days.

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In 2010, 14.9 million family and friends provided 17 billion hours of unpaid care to loved ones with Alzheimer’s and dementia. We find this extraordinary. Being a caregiver to someone who struggles with memory loss is no simple task, and we are truly humbled by the amount of time and energy these family caregivers have sacrificed for the well-being of their friends and family.

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For the patients of Alzheimer’s Disease and dementia, as well as their family members, memory loss can be a frightening and heartbreaking thing. That’s why we want to be there to make the process more manageable with the help of our dependable, understanding caregivers.

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