Blog | SYNERGY HomeCare

Alzheimer's

SYNERGY HomeCare is offering a fun and easy way to support the Walk to End Alz with the #SeniorSelfie campaign.

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Here are 9 things that can help improve nutrition for people who have Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, or who are just struggling with eating well. Always remember to consult a doctor before changing your diet!

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Guest blogger Michael Longsdon shares his insights into helping those who suffer from Alzheimer's Disease when coping with the loss of loved ones.

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There are so many different diets today catering to many different people depending on their goals. The MIND diet focuses on eating “brain healthy” foods, like berries and green vegetables.

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Every 70 seconds, someone develops Alzheimer’s. The disease is predicted to affect 1 in 85 people by 2050.

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The good news is we’re living longer. Medical advances have improved the odds of surviving conditions like heart disease and cancer. But as the population ages, a lot of us will develop Alzheimer’s. By 2025, more than 7 million Americans are expected to have the disease. Despite all the research, there is no cure.

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At-home senior care providers and their clients should follow these tips for keeping the kitchen safe.

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If you provide elderly home care services for a client with Alzheimer's or dementia, here are a few holiday-related activities to keep your client busy while at home.

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he Center For Disease Control classifies risk factors for falls into two categories: intrinsic and extrinsic.

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There are a variety of things seniors can do to help improve their memories like learn a language and get a good night's sleep.

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Loss of cognitive function and memory can happen as people age, especially if they suffer from an illness such as dementia or Alzheimer's.

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Music therapy can help seniors at risk for dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

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People who had mentally challenging jobs when they were part of the workforce have a lower chance of suffering mental decline while on the job and after retiring, according a study recently published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology.

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A new study published in The American Journal of Cardiology found cardiologists overlooked memory issues in almost 50 percent of elderly heart patients.

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Recent research at the Mayo Clinic has uncovered a stronger link to Alzheimer's and a history of concussions, according to published results recently shared in Neurology.

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Herbs such as rosemary and spearmint may help to fight off Alzheimer's by improving learning and memory, according to a study conducted by professionals at Saint Louis University. The enhanced extracts made from special antioxidants in these herbs can reduce deficits caused by mild cognitive impairment, a precursor to Alzheimer's disease.

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Most medications must be taken daily, but the instructions don't always specify what time of day is the best to take them.

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If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, there will come a point when you need to explain to grandchildren what is happening to Grandma or Grandpa.

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A four-month study found that individuals with Alzheimer's disease can increase brain function by singing songs from hit musicals, The Guardian reported.

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During the month of November, the Alzheimer's Association and other organizations work to spread the word about National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month.

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health recently completed a study on the possibility of a connection between lack of sleep and Alzheimer's disease

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After suffering an injury or medical condition, some patients are prescribed music therapy. This form of rehabilitation uses music to help individuals socially, cognitively, physically, emotionally or developmentally. 

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Women who suffer from stress during middle age may have a greater chance of developing Alzheimer's disease later in life, Bloomberg reported. Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden published the results of a study that spanned nearly 40 years and found that psychological stress is associated with a 21 percent greater risk of developing the disease. 

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According to researchers at Cork University in Ireland, blood pressure drugs may be able to slow the progression of Alzheimer's and even boost cognitive abilities

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One of the most common hazards someone in need of Alzheimer's care faces is the potential for wandering. Wandering can occur as either a side effect of medicine or because of an environmental trigger or a vague memory.

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The Buddy Program, as it is called, has produced 167 pairs and has benefited both the students and their mentors. For students, they are able to experience the struggles faced by Alzheimer's patients, their families and their caregivers through a weekly meeting where they can talk with them about their experiences or challenges with the disease.

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At some point, travel can become too disorienting or stressful for your loved one, but that doesn't mean that vacationing has to completely come to an end. You and your loved one can share in remembering past trips by recreating the sights or sounds right in the safe and familiar setting of your home.

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Incorporating music as a part of Alzheimer's care services can help ease the challenges that accompany the disease. Music can be used to effectively alter your client's mood, manage agitation caused by stress and activate the brain's cognitive abilities. It can also help with motor skills because the rhythmic patterns can evoke subconscious memories. Music isn't only soothing for the person with Alzheimer's disease either. Caregivers and family members can also benefit from the stress-relieving properties of music therapy.

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A recent study conducted by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and published in the journal Brain revealed that there are strong connections between cerebrovascular disease and the development of dementia such as Alzheimer's.

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While vacations are a time to relax and escape from the stressors of daily life, it is still important to be aware of the early signs of Alzheimer's Disease. Traveling away from home could possibly make the signs more noticeable.

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Summer is a popular time of the year for family reunions. If you or someone you love is in the early stages of Alzheimer's or receiving in home elder care as the condition progresses, it is important to talk to children about what is happening to their grandparent or other family member before the reunion.

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Memory loss can be a big factor to cope with when you have Alzheimer’s disease. However, proactive planning and seeking out Alzheimer’s care can help prevent components of the disease, like wandering and confusion. 

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According to the Alzheimer’s Association, the majority of people living with Alzheimer’s are 65 and older. This common form of dementia is also one of the greatest known risk factors that accompanies increasing age. While researchers are still working on a cure, there has been research behind various diet choices that have been linked to memory health and the prevention of Alzheimer’s. 

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Mayo Clinic researchers in Rochester, Minn., said that blood tests could be a new way to detect Alzheimer’s disease. This strategy could be helpful toward getting people with the disease adequate Alzheimer’s care. According to the study, researchers analyzed plasma and brain fluid from 45 people, 15 of whom had cognitive impairments and 15 who had Alzheimer’s disease. 

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Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, found that breathing in secondhand smoke could raise a person’s risk for Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. To take preventative measures and delay Alzheimer’s care, researchers recommend avoiding secondhand smoke. 

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Alzheimer’s care has many different facets. Everything from providing memory boosting activities to making adjustments around the house play a role, and diet can have an impact as well. Coconut oil in particular has attracted a great deal of attention when it comes to managing the condition, as experts have long found it could even treat other diseases such as Parkinson’s and multiple sclerosis. 

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Researchers are continually looking for effective drug treatments for Alzheimer’s patients, but they often face significant challenges in getting them approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, the agency recently announced it will be changing its guidelines to ease the approval process and potentially change the face of Alzheimer’s care, The New York Times reports. 

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Providing care to someone with Alzheimer’s takes a lot of heart. If you are a family caregiver for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, you know firsthand the heartbreak of seeing their mental health decline. As you continue caring with …

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Both resources are free and designed to help users provide better care to their family members. For instance, the Alzheimer’s Navigator relies on a survey that caregivers can take to provide them with tips ranging from financial planning to helping their loved ones complete daily activities. 

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Alzheimer’s and dementia are well-known diseases that affect people’s lives as they age. Supporting people with memory inhibiting diseases is something we do every day. We see the challenges that Alzheimer’s causes on every front, and are here to provide …

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Solanezumab, a once-promising Alzheimer’s drug, hit a snag when tests showed it didn’t slow the progression of the disease as much as originally thought. However, researchers looked at combined results of a pair of different studies and found that in patients with mild forms of the disease, it may work better than earlier research indicated, The New York Times reports. 

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Taking care of someone with Alzheimer’s disease is a round-the-clock responsibility. The effects of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia require patience, understanding and thoughtfulness on the part of you, the family caregiver. Whatever your loved one may forget, you need to remember. From medication reminders to turning off the stove, Alzheimer’s caregiving puts a big strain on you. With the well being of your senior loved one on the line, you want helpful information at your fingertips to help you provide the best care and cope with your emotional and physical needs. Here are a few sites to help. 

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There are several universal truths about people with Alzheimer’s disease. One of these is that they will constantly get their facts wrong. The knee-jerk reaction to this is to correct the person. “No, Daddy’s been dead for 5 years,” or “You can’t be hungry! You just had your breakfast!” or “You KNOW we’re going to the doctor today! I told you 5 minutes ago.” 

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According to the Alzheimer’s Association’s 2012 edition of Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures, currently “5.4 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease.” The annual report also states that an “estimated 800,000 individuals with Alzheimer’s (one in eight), live alone…and up to half of them do not have an identifiable caregiver.”

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Last month Debbie, a family caregiver and mother of three in Wisconsin went to check on her elderly father, John. Debbie was concerned when there was no response at the front door and used her spare key to enter John’s home. She found him lying on the kitchen floor, unable to get up after falling. Luckily, Debbie found him a short time after his fall, and a trip to the hospital showed no broken bones. However, John’s right arm and leg were hurt, and we would need to stay in a wheelchair and wear a sling for a few days.

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For the patients of Alzheimer’s Disease and dementia, as well as their family members, memory loss can be a frightening and heartbreaking thing. That’s why we want to be there to make the process more manageable with the help of our dependable, understanding caregivers.

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